Wednesday, April 7, 2010

an indoor flower garden

Remember what I said about sticking to one color when you arrange flowers? Well, scratch that. (Kinda.)

Although choosing monochromatic flowers is a no-fuss way to make a centerpiece, another one of my favorite ways to use flowers is to do the opposite: choose one type of flower in many different colors. I like to place each stem in a clear glass container, then cluster the vases together to create a garden-like effect. Stick to one type of bloom that comes in a rainbow of hues. Roses, ranunculus, daisies, tulips, and calla lillies are a few good options. Fancy vessels aren't necessary. You could use jelly or Mason jars, tall drinking glasses, or other containers like this cool test tube contraption I got as a gift.

Separating the stems into smaller containers makes a bigger impact than a bunch of blooms in a single vase. The display is ideal for a mantle or you could run the vases down the center of your dinner table for a runner-like effect. Just stick to low containers and keep the stems short so people can see each other.


8 comments:

Casey@Good. Food. Stories. said...

Looks like a gorgeous cat salad! Lenny's a fan of nomming on flowers, so we don't have them around too often... I live vicariously through you.

musingegret said...

Lovely pics and thank you sooooo much for providing the Mother's Day gift inspiration!

Tender Branson said...

Great looking set up. I thought my cat was the only one that chewed on flowers, Casey.

Daniel said...

Let's call this what it is: a flip-flop.

Appetite for Conversation said...

Beautiful!

Lisa said...

Casey & TB: I had no idea that cats eat flowers. Another reason I am a dog person!

Musingegret: Thank you! I hope she likes it.

Appetite for Conversation: Thanks!

The Neo-Traditionalist said...

Gorgeous! I'm saving these images for my wedding inspiration. Those colors would make such fun centerpieces!

Lisa said...

The Neo-Traditionalist: Oh, yes! This would be beautiful for a wedding. You could group the containers together in the center of a round table, or run them down the middle of long tables.

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